Spring is almost here! Celebrate the end of cold weather by attending a free event at Lincoln Center in March. See the calendar for a list of all upcoming events.

  • March 1

    Photo by Todd Kancar

    Joe McGinty & The Loser’s Lounge present: Donna Summer, A Night at the Disco! at the David Rubenstein Atrium
    Dress up like you're going back in time to your favorite New York City night club, then dance your way to the future with New York City's most entertaining house band. Tonight, Joe McGinty and The Loser's Lounge turn their gaze to the ultimate disco diva, Donna Summer. Platforms and polyester optional, but highly recommended if you want to win the evening's Best Dressed contest.

    • March 5

      Photo courtesy of the Frank Driggs Collection at Jazz at Lincoln Center

      Lincoln Center Moments: The Marion Cowings Jazz Band at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
      This free performance-based program is specially designed for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Join us as we bring Lincoln Center’s unparalleled artistry to an intimate and supported setting. This program includes a one-hour performance, followed by a one-hour art-making workshop for participants to reflect upon their experience.

      • March 8

        Photo by Emrâ Islek

        Stephanie Chou at the David Rubenstein Atrium
        New York–based saxophonist, singer, and composer Stephanie Chou makes beautiful experimental pop by blending traditional Chinese music with elements of jazz, contemporary classical music, spoken word, folk, and the American singer-songwriter tradition. Among the music on tonight's setlist, she'll perform works from her latest album, Asymptote, which includes invigorating arrangements of Chinese classics such as "Kangding Love Song," "The Moon Represents My Heart," the tongue twister "Eating Grapes," and a setting of one of Li Bai's most famous poems.

        • March 12

          Photo by Itzel Alejandra Martinez

          Reelabilities Film Festival at the David Rubenstein Atrium
          Accessibility at Lincoln Center is proud to present a screening and discussion as part of the annual ReelAbilities Film Festival. ReelAbilities Film Festival promotes awareness and appreciation of the lives, stories, and artistic expressions of people with different abilities. For more information about the festival, please visit NewYork.ReelAbilities.org.

          • March 15

            Photo by Deneka Peniston

            BIGYUKI at the David Rubenstein Atrium
            Hailing from the quaint Japanese town of Tsu City, Masayuki Hirano—the visionary musician behind BIGYUKI—creates colorful, spiritually driven electronic music that folds classical music, jazz, funk, hip-hop, club music, and gospel into a kaleidoscopic tapestry of sound. Colorful with power pop explosiveness, BIGYUKI has added his stylings to the live and recorded music of Bilal Oliver and Talib Kweli, performed live with Grammy Award–winning pianist Robert Glasper at a special tribute to the legendary Stevie Wonder, and frequently writes songs with artists like Jean and Marcus Baylor.

            • March 15

              Lincoln Center Moments: Art Baron and Friends at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
              This free performance-based program is specially designed for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Join us as we bring Lincoln Center’s unparalleled artistry to an intimate and supported setting. This program includes a one-hour performance, followed by a one-hour art-making workshop for participants to reflect upon their experience.

              • March 16

                ¡VAYA! 63: Eddie Palmieri at the David Rubenstein Atrium
                One of the most acclaimed pianists of the past 60 years and a New York salsa and Latin jazz icon, the nine-time Grammy winner Eddie Palmieri presides over a not-to-be-missed edition of our popular Latin dance party series. Opening set by DJ Bongohead.

                • March 17

                  LC Kids Storytime at the Atrium: Sheep 101 by Richard Morris at the David Rubenstein Atrium
                  From Richard T. Morris, author of This Is a Moose, and beloved illustrator LeUyen Pham comes a hilarious story with vibrant illustrations full of late-night hijinks that will spark every child's imagination.

                  AGES 2–5

                  • March 19

                    Renaissance: An Interactive Concert at the David Rubenstein Atrium
                    Kaleidoscope, the Teaching Artist Ensemble of the New York Philharmonic, presents an interactive concert to demonstrate the Philharmonic's approach to education and how participation deepens the musical experience. These professionals, who combine expertise in performance and engagement to kindle a love of music in students of all ages, examine themes explored in this season's Young People's Concerts for Schools, An African-American Legacy: The Harlem Renaissance, to show how listeners of all ages can respond to great works in their own ways.

                    • March 23

                      Photo by Waleed Shah

                      Tarek Yamani (Student Advisory Council Final Show) at the David Rubenstein Atrium
                      Experience the ecstatic fusion of jazz and Arabic rhythm and harmonies at the Lincoln Center debut performance of pianist and composer Tarek Yamani. The "trailblazing" Beirut-born, New York–based Yamani (CNN) has earned acclaim around the world for his "luminous music anchored in jazz harmony and in Arab traditions" (Télérama). Winner of the prestigious Thelonious Monk Jazz Composers Competition, Yamani has been fortunate to share the stage with luminaries such as Wayne Shorter, Richard Bona, Zakir Hussain, Esperanza Spalding, and Antonio Sanchez.

                      • March 29

                        Photo by Rita Carmo

                        António Zambujo at the David Rubenstein Atrium
                        António Zambujo is a singer of brilliant subtlety and elegance. Considered an innovative pioneer as well as an heir to traditional fado, his popularity as a singer and guitarist in Portugal and abroad comes from a restless curiosity of musical influences from fado to bossa nova and jazz to French chanson. Born in the Alentejo region of Portugal, he grew up listening to the cante alentejano—choirs of men and women who sing of the land on which they work, local saints, and lost love. In 2002, he was deemed the "Best New Fado Voice" by Radio Nova FM and the "Best Male Fado Singer" by the Amália Rodrigues Foundation in 2006. His eighth CD, Até Pensei que Fosse Minha (Until I Thought It Was Mine) is a tribute to the songs of Brazil's Chico Buarque, one of the great singer-songwriters in the Portuguese language.

                        • March 31

                          Independent Music Awards at the David Rubenstein Atrium
                          Be among the first to discover the year's best independent artists and releases from around the world at this day of performances by exceptional self-released and indie-label artists, drawn from 15 years of innovative IMA winners, nominees, and judges, serving up all styles of music. Learn more: IndependentMusicAwards.com

                          • Ongoing Events

                            Photo by Robert Hupka. Courtesy of the Estate of Robert Hupka, Arthur M. Fierro, executor. Toscanini Legacy Papers, Music Division, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

                            Leonard Bernstein at 100 at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (through March 24)
                            Leonard Bernstein at 100 celebrates the centennial of America’s greatest classical composer and conductor. Drawing from more than 150 photographs, personal items, papers, scores, correspondence, costumes, furniture, and films, Leonard Bernstein at 100 marks the official exhibit of the centennial and is the most comprehensive retrospective of Bernstein’s life and career ever staged in a museum setting.

                            Toscanini: Preserving a Legacy in Sound at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (through April 8)
                            The over 43,000 items represent the full array of audio formats in use during Toscanini’s lifetime, including lacquer, shellac, and vinyl discs, tape reels, cylinders, and wire recordings as well as the more obscure selenophone recordings and the metal parts used in the production of 78 rpm discs. As one of the world’s leading sound archives, the Library for the Performing Arts will place front and center Toscanini’s recordings through ongoing live demonstrations and free public programs devoted to the craft of preserving and archiving the technology he helped define during his lifetime.