Before the Grammy Award–winning Harlem Quartet brings its “fresh, bracing and intelligent” sound to the David Rubenstein Atrium for a free show on February 22, we asked them to share some of their favorite neighborhood spots for relaxing after rehearsal. Violinist Melissa White compiled their responses.

  • Red Rooster & Ginny's Supper Club

    Red Rooster Harlem

    If you're only able to make one stop in Harlem, this would be our #1 suggestion. Red Rooster has a delicious soul food and southern cuisine–inspired menu with wonderful drinks, fantastic live music, and a great vibe all around!

    • ROKC (Ramen, Oysters, Kitchen, Cocktails)

      ROKC (Ramen, Oysters, Kitchen, Cocktails)

      This restaurant is our favorite spot for ramen and is also known for artistic and amazingly delicious cocktails. It's a tiny spot, so be ready to wait a while for a table, but it will definitely be worth it!

      • Lido

        Lido

        It's a treat to be able to be able to find incredible quality Italian food uptown. This restaurant has a lovely atmosphere with extremely tasty northern Italian cuisine, and wonderful service.

        • Harlem Public

          Harlem Public

          One of our favorite places for a nice burger (and don't miss the infamous avocado fries)! A go-to escape for us after a long day of music-making, especially thanks to their extensive selection of American craft beers.

        About the Artists

        Harlem Quartet was founded in 2006 by the Sphinx Organization, which wanted to create a group comprised of first-place laureates of the Sphinx Competition to achieve the overall mission of bringing classical music to inner-city school children.

        The name Harlem Quartet comes from the neighborhood in New York City that holds such a rich piece of American history, the Harlem Renaissance. During the 1920s, Harlem became a beacon of hope for educated African Americans who were looking for better opportunities in the North. We like to think that the work we do—bringing classical music to schools in Harlem and around the world—is in line with this cultural renaissance.